Inescapable Logic

When you assume there is such a thing as evil,
you must assume there is such a thing as good.
When you assume there is such a thing as good,
you must assume there is such a thing as a moral law,
on the basis of which to differentiate between good and evil.
When you assume there is such a thing as a moral law,
you must posit a moral law Giver.

If there is no moral law Giver, there is no moral law.
If there is no moral law, there is no good.
If there is no good, there is no evil.

If sin is lawlessness (1 John 3:4),
and all have sinned (Rom 3:23),
and if the wages of sin is death (Rom 6:23),
then I need a Savior.

If I still need a Savior there must,
still be an eternal, moral law, or…
I no longer need a Savior.

6 thoughts on “Inescapable Logic

  1. I totally agree. Without the Law (aka Torah), there is no moral order. Have you any knowledge of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church?

  2. I am familiar enough with them to know that they continue to keep a Saturday Sabbath, and also that they include the Apocrypha in their canon, but I’m not sure that I know a whole lot more than that…

  3. They circumcise their male offspring. They obey the dietary laws established by Yahweh. Their canon includes the Book of Enoch (which I am presently reading). I have just begun to investigate their faith practice. My husband and I were confirmed in the Anglican Church in 2011, but our church closed in 2014. Everything happens according to God’s Purposes.

  4. Interesting. I am an Anglican priest. Having studied the Book of Enoch extensively, I would have major issues with considering it Scripture. While it is fascinating in its background to certain things, the calendrical and astronomical information it contains is incorrect and contradictory.

  5. As a priest, you would know far better than I what books should be considered canon. That being said, I wonder what counter-argument (if any) the Ethiopian Orthodox Priests might offer. It seems to me that generally-speaking, the Orthodox world views Scripture through a rather mystical lens.

    On Sun, Jan 14, 2018 at 1:41 PM, Long-ing For Life wrote:

    > Nate commented: “Interesting. I am an Anglican priest. Having studied the > Book of Enoch extensively, I would have major issues with considering it > Scripture. While it is fascinating in its background to certain things, the > calendrical and astronomical information it conta” >

  6. Yeah, I don’t know, but a mystical approach would be a good possibility for what might be their approach.

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