Sacrifice as Portal

Where did life begin? In Eden. In Eden were all the necessities of life: nourishment, shelter, communion, knowledge, purpose, and identity.

What is a sacrifice? The separation of body from life by a blade, and consumption of that body by fire.

What did God put at the entry to Eden? An angel with a fiery sword.

What are we to conclude? Access to life is made via sacrifice, and the life you want is a result of being separated from your flesh, and letting former things be consumed that you might find new life, no longer in the flesh, but in God.

I beseech you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Romans 12:1

The significance of an animal offering, the reason why the aroma of the animal turned into rising smoke becalms God’s “burning nostrils” (the Hebraic term for God being angry) is that it represents a complete offering to God, nothing is reserved, all is given, fulfillment is realized in giving up one’s tenuous claim to physical life and finding new purpose in being made living spirit-rising smoke/cloud. We think of it as violence, God views it as total dedication, and in receiving that offering He imbues the animal with spirit (transforms it into smoke, and receives it into Himself, whose glory is always seen on earth as fire or smoke, pillar or cloud).

Please consider the previous paragraph provisional. I’m exploring something here; I know I’m on to something, but I wouldn’t want to be pinned down to defending it as presently expressed.

A Perspective on Grief

In Christ, all death brings about new life.

“You started life in the cozy comfort of your mother’s womb, but then you got squeezed out, screaming. You died to the womb to come alive in the world. Then you had your first day of school, your first date, your wedding, your first child, your first grandchild, the death of your mother and father. Each of these crisis moments is a small death that shatters the world as you know it. If life carries on at all, it carries on with a new, unknown horizon. No wonder life can be terrifying. You’re constantly dying to this to come alive to that.”

Sacrifice is an act of separation, of division. The animal is divided into parts, some of which are laid on the altar, some of which are thrown away, in some cases some of which are eaten and some of which are given to God.

Adam is put into a comatose state, as if he died, and his ribs are separated. When he rises again, God has brought about new life from his side.

Christ is hung on the cross and his ribs are separated by a spearhead, and from his side flows blood and water, which gives rise to new life.

Grain yearns to reach fulfillment by virtue of being separated from its husk, ground and baked, that it might rise to new life as bread.

“Sacrifice is a pathway, a movement through death to new life. In sacrifice, we die to one state so we can rise in an exalted state.”

Are you grieving, Christian? What is dying or to what are you dying? And what is being given new life or to what new life are you rising?

This meditation was inspired by a couple sections of Theopolitan Liturgy by Peter Leithart (including pages 51 – 55). The quotes are from those pages and the ideas are restatements of, or were provoked by, ideas from the book, applied to the concept of grieving.

Confession

Vibrating with rage, the misshapen, bony finger pointed at me. “He is a law breaker,” the Adversary screamed.

I stepped behind Jesus and his shadow fell across me: “I confess, I am blameless,” I said in grateful relief.

Pondering Interrelationship

If “cultures are patterned environments of material things” we must ask, whence arises a zeitgeist? One cannot divorce the two, and yet each material thing itself has no spirit. Together, however, they engender a spirit of the age, which is unmistakably perceivable and formative.

Freedom of Speech

Tim: Prove to me that Freedom of Speech exists.

Nate: Exists in the USA or exists as a God-given right?

Tim: Both.

Nate: How do we know that free speech is a God-given right? God speaks. We are commanded to imitate God (Ephesians 5:1), therefore we must have the right to express ourselves as well.

Does the right of free speech exist in the framework of the United States? Yes. The first amendment reads, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.”

Note here that the freedom of speech is inextricably connected with the freedom to exercise one’s religion. The civil government is God’s construct; it cannot restrict what He has commanded.

To elaborate on the first paragraph… we have a God-given responsibility to speak. Responsibility invokes authority; one cannot be given a responsibility without also receiving the commensurate authority necessary to fulfill that responsibility. God speaks; God commands us to imitate Him, ergo, we have a responsibility and the inextricable authority to speak: the right to free speech, unrestricted by a construct also given its domain of authority by God. An authority which can never impose itself upon the authority given by God to other created entities, like the right to free speech, or the unregulated exercise of religion